Gringo
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Gringo

Gringo

Projecting Gringo a very fixed and intense gaze towards their references, regardless of the discipline involved, can be a double-edged sword for a creator. Of course, having clear tonal and stylistic aspirations marked by the work of key figures in the medium can be inspiring, but, on the other hand, it could weigh down a production to the point of turning it into a kind of Frankenstein monster that may well be fortunate to be functional or, conversely, get lost in an abyss full of faulty copies.

With his second feature film, released under the title ‘Gringo: Wanted alive or dead’, the Australian stuntman and short filmmaker Nash Edgerton – brother of the actor and also director Joel Edgerton – has opened his cocktail shaker to shape a thriller so outdated and Crazy like its characters, in which the very essence of Quentin Tarantino’s cinema, the Coen brothers and a Guy Ritchie less accelerated than usual come together in a mixture, at least, peculiar.

The result, far from being the multi-referential hodgepodge disaster you might expect, ends up providing nearly two hours of unhealthy fun; Captained by some grotesque protagonists and performed wonderfully, some agile dialogues loaded with bad slobber, a black humor like coal and all kinds of excesses that, ultimately, end up playing against him and distancing him from the remarkable.

If there is a word that fits one hundred percent – for better or for worse – with ‘Gringo’, that is “chaos.” And it is that once the cards have been dealt and presented to the players during its absorbing first act, the film begins a thunderous game in which farces, betrayals and bad decisions are happening with anarchy and chance as driving mechanisms .

Duration: 111 min

Release:

IMDb: 6.1